News Release

ISMP Announces 21st Annual Cheers Awards Recipients

The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) is proud to announce its 21st Annual Cheers Awards winners.  The winners of this year’s awards are:

E. Robert Feroli Jr, PharmD, FASHP

Dr. Feroli (Bob) is being honored for his remarkable leadership and ongoing contributions to medication safety both in the U.S. and internationally. He served as the Medication Safety Officer at Johns Hopkins Hospital Department of Pharmacy Services (JHH), during which he and Nicole Mollenkopf, PharmD, MBA, BCPS, established an American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) accredited medication-use safety residency; Nicole became the first resident in the U.S. to graduate from such a program. Bob helped develop the Medication Safety Officer Society (MSOS) and hosts an every-other-month webinar for MSOS members. Although he recently retired from JHH, Bob remains active in medication safety. He holds a faculty appointment with Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality and helped produce their online certificate program for patient safety. Bob also helped to produce ASHP and ISMP’s online medication safety certificate program. In addition, he serves as a Board member of the Maryland Patient Safety Center and is active on several ISMP advisory boards. Working with Johns Hopkins International, Bob has visited 14 international hospitals to help them improve medication safety and quality.

Eskenazi Health Pharmacy Department

The Eskenazi Health Pharmacy Department is receiving a Cheers Award for creating an objective method to identify and evaluate high-alert medications, both retrospectively and prospectively. Published literature related to identification of high-alert medications is limited. To address the gap, the Indianapolis-based department conducted a 3-year project to develop, validate, and expand the usefulness of their High-Alert Medication Stratification Tool-Revised (HAMST-R). In Phase I, the team revised and honed a high-alert medication checklist originally created by members of ASHP’s Medication Safety Section Advisory Group, which allows organizations to determine whether or not a particular medication should be considered “high-alert” based on an overall safety score. This led to a national Phase II validation study, and a national Phase III study that is currently underway to examine prospective use of a modified version of the tool, HAMST-R PRO. The findings from Phase I and II of the study and the preliminary results from Phase III have been presented at national meetings, and results from Phase I have been published in the Journal of Patient Safety.

Valley Medical Center Clinic Network

Valley Medical Center Clinic Network is being recognized for its exemplary efforts to decrease its vaccination error rate. Valley Medical Center is a proud member of the UW Medicine Health System, with a Clinic Network of more than 60 primary care, urgent care, and specialty care clinics that see more than 400,000 patients every year. In 2017 alone, the Clinic Network administered more than 56,000 vaccines. To prevent errors, the Clinic Network implemented evidence-based practices, improved staff engagement, and optimized clinical decision support in the electronic health record (EHR). The vaccine workflow was redesigned to reinforce the use of the state immunization registry for vaccine history verification, increase reliance on EHR order sets that intelligently adapt to the patient’s age, and emphasize the importance of documenting vaccines prior to administration. To reduce the vaccination error rate further, the Clinic Network is working to automatically remove expired lot numbers from the lot manager in the EHR and exploring the use of barcode scanning for all administered vaccinations. This initiative resulted in an 85% decrease in the vaccination error rate between 2013 and 2017.

Jo Wyeth, PharmD

Dr. Wyeth has worked tirelessly to advance medication safety and foster collaborative efforts with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), both internally and externally. As the FDA’s Postmarketing Surveillance Program Lead for the Division of Medication Error Prevention and Analysis (DMEPA), Office of Surveillance and Epidemiology, and Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, she has served as a liaison between ISMP and several departments within FDA. Dr. Wyeth and her DMEPA colleagues have focused attention within the agency on safety issues that ISMP has identified and helped facilitate packaging and labeling changes to prevent errors and protect patients. She has made valuable contributions to ISMP’s newsletters, organized an FDA effort to determine tall man letters for similar drug name pairs, and instituted regular meetings with ISMP to share new safety concerns and follow up on ongoing issues. Dr. Wyeth serves on the USP Healthcare Safety and Quality Expert Committee and has promoted needed changes to standards as well as new safety guidance for drug compounding facilities, investigational drugs, and product identifiers.

Brad Noé, MBA

The George Di Domizio Award was established in 2012 in memory of a late ISMP Board member who advocated for greater cooperation between the medical industry and the broader healthcare community to promote safer drug products. The award is being given this year to Brad Noé, MBA for his collaborative work to address medication safety issues on a national and global level. Brad has spent more than 30 years in the medical device industry at BD, and is currently Global Manager, Technical Resources Hypodermic Business. During his career, he has shared ideas and helped develop innovative solutions related to drug stability, drug shortages, and other emerging concerns. He has worked closely with ISMP to gain national momentum to remove the caps on oral syringes, which could pose a choking hazard--BD was the first company to do so. Brad’s responsiveness and altruistic approach has set the standard for the advancement of organizational and industry partnership on medication safety problems.

Timothy S. Lesar, PharmD

The ISMP Lifetime Achievement Award is being presented to Timothy S. Lesar, PharmD. Dr. Lesar is well known for his important research in medication safety. He is an educator, practitioner, and safety leader who has increased understanding of medication errors, particularly prescribing errors. His work has been published in high visibility professional peer-reviewed journals such as the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Annals of Emergency Medicine, and American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy. Dr. Lesar serves as an advisor to ISMP as well as FDA, and is a former member of the FDA Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. He also has received an individual ISMP Cheers Award and the ASHP Award for Achievement in the Professional Practice of Pharmacy in Health Systems. Dr. Lesar is Director of Clinical Pharmacy Services and a Patient Care Services Director at Albany Medical Center in Albany, NY.

The 2018 Cheers keynote speaker will be Ana McKee, MD, Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer of The Joint Commission. Dr. McKee’s responsibilities include providing support to The Joint Commission’s Patient Safety Advisory Group, overseeing development of the National Patient Safety Goals and Sentinel Event Alerts, supervising the Sentinel Event Database, and managing The Joint Commission’s Office of Quality and Patient Safety. She is the former board chair for the Pennsylvania Safety Authority and has served on the FDA’s Advisory Committee on expediting anti-HIV medication approvals. Prior to her current position, she served as Chief Medical Officer and Associate Executive Director at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System. Dr. McKee was named as one of Modern Healthcare’s 2014 Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare.

Journalists who wish to attend the awards dinner should contact Renee Brehio at 614-376-0212, or email [email protected].

 

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